How to use a Fitbit Charge 2 Like a Smart Watch

I’ve been extremely satisfied with my FitBit Charge 2; I upgraded to it from using a Charge HR, which was also a nice little device on its own. The Charge 2 is leaps and bounds over it. But it’s not a smart watch.

Initially, I was okay with this. I figured that I didn’t need a smart watch – they were a cool thing and probably useful for some people, but not my thing. I was just interested in the fitness tracking aspect of it. That was true until I bought my wife an Apple Watch and got to see how truly cool and useful it was. So, I talked myself into getting a smart watch of my own.

But in the meantime, I decided that I would make the most of my Charge 2 and try to get some smart watch features going on my own.

This guide I’ve put together is something I came up with on my own to make it “smart watch-y”, and relies on using the Android phone OS; I’m sure you could probably get some of the same experience on an iPhone, but some of the things I describe are Android-only.

Notifications

The easiest thing to activate are notifications. This aspect is built into the Charge 2 already, allowing you to be notified on your wrist of incoming calls, calendar events, and select notifications. Out of the box, it only supports text messages and Facebook Messenger. However, if you have an Android device (like me), you can add a few more options here.

For me, I had an extra option showing – AutoNotification. This is a plugin for the automation program Tasker, which I use a lot. Theoretically you could route all your notifications through AutoNotification and then send them that way through your FitBit. This might be the best solution, since you can customize how your notifications appear in fine detail, so this might also improve your experience on your phone at the same time.

But if you’re not really up for fine tuning and customizing to the Nth degree, you should consider the app Fit Notifications. This app is compatible with a few other FitBit devices, and essentially allows you to send notifications for just about every app on your phone to your FitBit. You just need to select Fit Notifications as your notification service for messages in the FitBit app, and then select which apps you want to receive notifications from in the Fit Notifications settings. Simple as that, making it the most efficient method of receiving customized notifications.

My current clock face of choice

Clock Face

The next step is to pick a cool looking clock face. While it would be fantastic if you could create custom clock faces, or import faces from other people, it’s just not possible. FitBit provides a few different faces to choose from – go with what looks good to you. But try to pick something that makes good use of the entire screen.

At the end of the day, this part isn’t the most important change, but helps aesthetically to create the illusion of using a smart watch.

Calendar Notifications

This probably deserves to be grouped under ‘notifications’ in general, but make sure you have your calendar set up in the notifications for your device. To fully utilize this you’ll probably want to make sure you have event reminders set up as well, otherwise you won’t get the notifications for any events.

Again, it’s not a huge piece of the puzzle, but put together with everything else and it helps complete it.

That’s It!

You’re done! I have to do some more research on this, but I think that’s all that you can do to try to recreate the smart watch experience with a FitBit Charge 2. The rest is really already done for you – fitness tracking is built-in, as it’s the primary feature; and you can turn on / off alarms at your convenience in the menus on your device.

It’s not perfect, but it might help you decide whether or not you really need a smart watch after all. Since I haven’t purchased an Ionic yet, this might end up changing my mind. Who knows?

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