Android Nougat First Impressions

I’ve had Nougat for a week by the time this post will publish, but I’ve got some first impressions based on my first few days of use. For reference, I use a Samsung Galaxy S7 edge, and it was upgraded from Marshmallow to 7.0.  Other relevant info – I’m using Evie Launcher*.

And yes, I realize that I’m a year late and Android O is already in the works, to release sometime this year.  Blame Samsung.

First Reaction

I really, really like the way this looks.  Everything looks sleek and well-designed.  If this makes any sense to you, it looks less “cartoon-y”, something which Samsung has been gradually moving away from since I started with the Galaxy S3.  Starting with Lollipop, they’ve been moving toward a more “stock” look with their notification / quick launch drawer.  I like it.

Digging Deeper

Past the visual elements, my phone somehow feels snappier.  I don’t really think it actually is any faster, but it feels like it is, which is important.  I feel like there’s something operating behind the scenes (maybe faster animation speeds?) that is making the difference.  I’m not speaking from a technological angle here – I don’t think they’ve done anything on the software side to affect RAM for example – but the software seems…optimized.  That’s the best term I can think of for it.

Battery life seems to be improved.  It’s hard for me to tell for sure, because I’m not using my phone the way I normally do right now.  Sometimes I’m actually using it less than I normally do.  The first day, I used it a LOT because I was playing around with it, and the battery life suffered accordingly.  Last Thursday though, I noticed that my battery life was only at 64% or so near the end of my work day, so that’s impressive.  I think some of the battery saving measures behind the scenes have been improved for Nougat.

Some other cool things have opened up for me, now that I have Nougat.  Previously, only Samsung’s Messages app allowed you to type out replies from the notification window.  Nougat adds this ability, so now I can do that with an app like Allo.  It’s pretty handy if you don’t want to leave whatever screen you’re on.  The other neat thing that Samsung added was some more utility to their Always On Display function on the S7 edge.

If they stopped at just adding more icon notifications I would have been happy; but you can also double-tap the app icon and it will unlock the screen and open the app with the notification.  That’s really cool and very useful!  To give you a quick comparison, on Marshmallow, only Samsung’s messages app and phone icons would show on Always On Display, and you couldn’t open the apps from there.

Overall Impression

This is definitely a very cool step forward for Android.  I don’t think that this update is revolutionary, but it’s the kind of update that would breathe new life into a phone (for example, if I added this to my S6 edge if it still worked – that would be amazing).  I don’t know how many phones will actually be getting it, as manufacturers tend to drop older phones from support even though they are capable of taking new operating system upgrades.

If you were on the fence of upgrading (or have the option of flashing a custom ROM with Nougat on it), you should definitely do it.  There aren’t any noticeable bugs that I can see and it runs really well.  It can only get better.  Can’t wait until I get Android O in 2018!

* I’ve actually switched back to Nova Launcher, because they added “Dynamic” notification badges, which are really cool and you should look into.

Coming up on Thursday: more Android talk focusing on Waze.

Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 – A Non-Technical Review

Most of the reviews I looked up when trying to get more info on this device were heavily technical in nature.  Great for comparisons, but a lot of the terms and numbers went over my head.  I’ve since purchased the device (and I’m writing this post with it, in part!), so I thought I’d give a more practical hands-on review.

Display

The display on this thing is absolutely amazing. It is what’s called “Super AMOLED”. I’m not really sure what that means, other than that it’s optimized to not light up the screen when black pixels are present. And it’s a super version of that.

Last night, I watched the highlights of the Ottawa Senators win over the Columbus Blue Jackets, and the display quality was noticeably better than what I’d get on my TV.  The tablet also has a 4:3 aspect ratio, which means that when I watch Star Trek: The Next Generation in HD, it plays in full screen.  It’s amazing.

Physical Input

I didn’t know how to label this section – but this is the best I came up with.  The device inputs are your standard touch screen inputs – your fingers.  But I also bought a Logitech Type-S keyboard case to go with it, which is how I was typing with earlier in this post.

But it doesn’t stop there.

I was playing Blades of Steel using a Logitech USB Gamepad.
I was playing Blades of Steel using a Logitech USB Gamepad.

As you can see in the above photo, I was able to hook up a Logitech Gamepad I bought years ago for my laptop and play NES games with it.  Specifically I was playing Blades of Steel.  I’m hoping that some of the other games I have will support it (such as Knights of the Old Republic).

But that’s not all, either.  I then hooked up a USB mouse/keyboard combo and was pleasantly surprised to see that those worked as well.  There’s even a mouse cursor / pointer when you attach a USB mouse to the tablet.  Essentially, this is going to act as a pretty decent laptop replacement.

Unfortunately, my USB mic did not work when I connected it to the tablet.  I have to figure that one out still – but I have some ideas for that.  One thought is that my USB mic is technically a Rock Band mic, so that could be a mitigating factor right there.

Software

Nothing out of the ordinary here; out of the box it was running Android 5 (Lollipop) but immediately after I set it up, there were software updates to bring it up to Android 6 (Marshmallow).  So, it’s functionally the same as my S7 edge in terms of the operating system – and both devices should be getting an update to Nougat (Android 7) “soon”.

What I was happy about was that it wasn’t over-loaded with software bloat; my previous tablet, the Galaxy Tab 4, came with a bunch of stuff I never used and just took up precious space.  I haven’t fully explored everything, but from what I can see there wasn’t too much extra.

A welcome pre-installation was Microsoft Office Mobile.  Waiting for me to sign into my Microsoft account were OneDrive, Word, Excel, and other mobile Office suite apps.  I’ve used them before, but when used on the Tab S2’s 9.7 inch screen they actually look and feel closer to their desktop counterparts.

Also pre-installed is Samsung’s SideSync, which allows you to remotely control your phone and transfer files.  It’s a pretty nifty feature to have, though I have yet to make full use of it.  It’s definitely fun to play with!

Overall impressions

Overall, from just one weekend with the device, I’d give it an 8.5/10.  I love the size of it, and having the extra input options just put it over the top.  It loses points based on the fact that you kind of need these additional input options to get good solid use out of it.  I feel like it should be able to stand on its own – which it mostly does, but not completely.

The Tab S3 is coming out in 2017 so now is the perfect time to jump on the S2 bandwagon.  It’s amazingly fast, display quality is top notch, and gives you everything you can do with Android, plus a few extras that only Samsung can give you.