Crazy Rich Asians – Review

Vanessa and I saw this movie last Saturday – we both decided that based on the previews, it looked like a fun film and it was going to be funny.  Before I go on, I’ll confirm that yes, it WAS a good film, and it WAS funny.  We loved it.  

Online Backlash

One of the things I like to do after seeing a movie is to see what other people think of it.  So I headed to reddit’s /r/movies to check out what kind of reception it had…and nope Nope NOPE do not go there yourself, I do not recommend it.  To put it nicely, there was a lot of negative feedback.  

People were really hating on the film.  Thankfully it wasn’t because of its (mostly) all-Asian cast, it was because the film itself was in their opinion, lacklustre.  I will admit, it’s a basic fish-out-of-water romantic comedy in terms of plot.  Most of the beats you’d expect are there.  In that sense, I agree with them.  It was not a great film. 

But I thought the writing was clever, the jokes hit home, and the movie was paced well.  The music was fantastic (go listen to the soundtrack!), the camera work and shots were beautiful, and I felt drawn into the movie and we both related to a few different parts of it.  

To me, that makes a successful movie.  Oh, and the fact that it was an all-Asian cast had nothing to do with my enjoyment of the movie.  I think you could replace it with a “diverse” cast and write the same movie and it would have worked just as well.  The “Crazy Rich Asians” part of it was just the setting / window-dressing.  I am not Asian so this fact did not resonate as much with me as others, though.  

One of the other reasons I advise NOT going to check out the /r/movies discussion about Crazy Rich Asians is because some people are dismissing the movie because of the all-Asian cast.  Trust me, some of the worst people are on reddit.  

I liked it, OK?

Look, the bottom line here is – enjoy the movie for what you see on the screen.  Just like I would say for Black Panther, ignore the casting aspect of it and enjoy it for the story, the jokes, and the stunning visuals.  If you can’t get past who was cast in the movie, you’re not going to be able to stop and appreciate the artistry involved in it (and probably there are other issues you’re dealing with that maybe you should reflect upon).

Avengers Infinity War – Review (Spoilers)

I put “spoilers” in the title, but they’re probably pretty mild.  Honestly, I need to see this movie a second time to really take it in.  There’s a lot going on here.

I'm pretty sure this is an accurate representation of Thanos' Gauntlet.
I’m pretty sure this is an accurate representation of Thanos’ Gauntlet.

I liked the movie.  Quite a bit more than I expected to, honestly.  What I expected was a mostly coherent movie with all of the established movie characters on screen thrown together.  What we got instead was a very coherent movie with all of these characters on screen, but they were put together in a very logical manner.  What I thought worked very well for it was that it featured the cosmic players primarily (i.e. Guardians of the Galaxy, Thor, Dr. Strange to an extent), with Earth’s heroes crossing over.

Essentially, similarly to how Captain America: Civil War was basically an Avengers movie, Avengers: Infinity War was basically a Guardians of the Galaxy movie.  This makes sense to me, because the villain (Thanos) is cosmic in scale, so it follows that we would be dealing with characters that operate on a cosmic scale.  It’s rather interesting to me that Earth is only important in that two of the stones are there, but it’s not important enough that Thanos personally wants to go there until the very end (he sends his “children” to go get the stones).

Some pieces of the movie I didn’t completely like.  The part at the beginning with Vision trying to pass as a human in a relationship with Wanda was interesting, but I feel like we jumped quite a bit from his attempts at domesticity in Civil War to being in love with Wanda here in Infinity War.  I was told about a Vision comic book story line recently where he tries to start a family, so I guess that’s where this came from in the movie.  All of the other characters seemed to have made logical progresses, but this one was a big leap.

I also didn’t completely like Banner in this one.  I hope that there is a logical reasoning for sidelining the Hulk (I wonder if it’s possible they’re going to split him into two characters?  I think that’s a thing that happens in the comics) in part two of Infinity War.

One last nitpick – Infinity War seemed to undo a lot of what happened in Thor: Ragnarok.  In that movie, Thor discovers – he doesn’t really need the hammer.  He loses an eye.  In Infinity War, he regains an eye (comically stolen by Rocket) and gets a big axe.  Now that I think about it, looking at The Hulk and Thor specifically, a lot of Ragnarok’s work is reversed with Infinity War, for some reason.

Overall, I appreciate how Marvel has really widened the scope of its movies over the years since the first phase: we started with individual hero movies, with only secondary characters overlapping (Fury, Coulson), leading up to the big collaboration movie: The Avengers.  That was The Big Event movie.  While each individual film dealt with mostly Earth-bound villains, The Avengers was the first to open up the Earth to Space (well, technically I guess Thor did that first).

Then they slowly started building up the universe – crossing characters over in The Winter Soldier, and then the larger cast in Civil War.  There are still some isolated movies, like Black Panther and Ant-Man movies (and presumably, the upcoming Captain Marvel movie) but I don’t think there will be many more ‘primary character only’ movies with the OG Avengers.

I can’t think of much more interesting things to say about Infinity War without watching it again.  I highly recommend you listen to these podcasts, which go much more in-depth than I ever could:

And, I haven’t listened to it yet, but Make Dad Read Comics did an episode about the comic for which this movie is based on, The Infinity Gauntlet, if you’re interested in some background comic information.

 

Logan (2017) – Review

I finally had the chance to see Logan, the 2017 film from James Mansgold.  This was a really good movie on its own, but also a great super hero movie entry in the X-Men series.

Logan is based on the Old Man Logan comic books, and is set in 2029 – when mutants are all but extinct (at the start of the movie there are only three we know about: Logan, Charles Xavier, and Calliban).  Oh, and the funniest bit is that Logan is an uber driver, rolling around in a limo.  I thought that was great.

What follows in the movie is not your standard superhero movie plot to save the world from impending doom; instead it’s actually a pretty personal story (for Logan / Wolverine) and about a journey from point A to point B.  Stuff happens along the way, both good and bad.  I have to say that this is probably the best Marvel movie I’ve seen since Captain America: Winter Soldier.

A lot of the buzz about this movie was that it was rated R; the rating comes for mainly the graphic violence and some language.  I think that this movie would have worked without the graphic nature of the violent scenes, but at the same time – Wolverine is a very violent character, so including it seemed to help make the movie fit more with his character.  That said – the action scenes that included most of the violence were shot quick (though not in a blur, like some movies – it was very easy to follow along on the screen), and wasn’t “shocking” the way that violence like this can be (I’m thinking of Game of Thrones, or even one of the more recent episodes of Star Trek: Discovery).

What I think is the greatest move in this was creating a realistic future setting.  It’s only set in 2029 – so just 12 years from when it was released (2017).  It sounds like it’s far away, but it’s not – and the technology reflects it.  Cell phones are recognizable as cell phones, and there are some projections that make sense – driver-less transport trucks, for example.  Beyond that, it was a relate-able world.

Contrast this to a movie like Minority Report; that one was set in 2054, at the time 52 years ahead of the release date (2002).  Apparently they hired some consultants to brainstorm what technological advances we’d see in 50 years, and they came up with a world that mostly operates the same, but with hyper-inflated technology (the cars they were using were a bit much).  Yeah, some of the technology they showed has surfaced in the last 16 years, but watching that movie recently makes me feel like it’s closer to the 60’s vision of the future in The Jetsons.  Suffice it to say I think Logan’s vision of the (near) future is a good portrayal, and one I think you can extrapolate from.

I thought it was also interesting to note that cell phones were used in some plot points in the movie (minor bits), but were not integral to any of the major events in the movie.  I bring this up only because some people think cell phones have ruined movies – that a lot of scenarios can be solved by the main character simply being able to relay information via cell phone.  There were no plot contrivances in this movie that negated the use of a cell phone, it was simply a plot that didn’t need to rely on communication to get out of jams.  I just wanted to point out that it’s possible to do that.

I think Patrick Stewart really stole the show as Xavier.  It was Logan’s movie, but Xavier shined in this.  I’m glad that the trailers didn’t give too much away, because the movie definitely didn’t unfold the way I thought it would based on some of the scenes they showed, and what I knew going in about his character.

Solid movie overall.  I highly recommend it; and you definitely don’t need to have seen the other X-Men movies to follow along.

Top Baseball Movies

The World Baseball Classic has officially started, and Spring Training has been underway for weeks now.  I can’t think of a better time to talk about my personal top baseball movies.

Other than being about baseball, there’s no real criteria for how I’ve ranked these.  They range from comedy to drama, and the genre doesn’t really affect how much I like the film.

Moneyball

I read the book well before the movie was announced; I think I wasn’t the only one just a little bit skeptical of whether or not an adaptation would be successful.  A lot of liberties were taken to be sure, but the movie works.  The characters are great and visually, it looks gorgeous.  You can’t help but be romantic about baseball.

Major League I & II

I watched these out of order, first seeing Major League II with my brother in a hotel room when it came on TV.  I understood none of the jokes that weren’t obvious, but years later I re-watch both of these films often.

Field of Dreams

You could probably group this one thematically with Moneyball if you were planning a baseball movie marathon.  Everyone remembers “If you build it, they will come” and it’s pretty much a movie being entirely romantic about baseball.

A League of Their Own

“There’s no crying in baseball!”  Another one I watched as a kid, and another one where some of the jokes went over my head.  A fantastic telling of the women that played baseball during the war.  Did not realize until much later in life that Bill Pullman (aka Lone Star) was in this film.

Angels in the Outfield

I’ve watched this movie countless times, and even today it holds up.  I recently discovered that there was actually an earlier black & white film of the same name that centered around the Pittsburgh Pirates.  I have yet to track it down, but would love to watch it.

42

I’ve got a few issues with this movie, but overall I think it’s great.  The actors buy in 100%, except for Harrison Ford, who buys in 120%.

Trouble With the Curve

This isn’t the greatest movie on the list, but has its charm.  Clint Eastwood plays an aging baseball scout going on One Last Road Trip with his daughter.  Justin Timberlake is also in this for some reason?  The funny thing about this movie is that it feels like a direct response from the baseball scouting world against Moneyball, where the villains of the movie rely solely on computer data and analysis instead of the good old eye test.

Mr. Baseball

I watched this one recently – I’d never seen it, even though we had it recorded on VHS.  I thought it was a really great “clash of cultures” film that happened to be about baseball.

Bull Durham

I think I’ve only watched this once, but it’s definitely a good film.  I need to mark this one down for a re-watch.

Rookie of the Year

The prevailing memory of this baseball movie for me is renting it (on VHS, remember, I’m 33) for a sleepover party when I was 9 or 10.  Daniel Stern gets his shot at putting in 120% in this one.  Hot ice!

Basketball

Not technically a baseball movie in the literal sense, it is however a spiritual baseball movie.  From the creators of South Park, this is a great one to watch that picks on some of the weirder aspects of sports.

Bad News Bears(remake)

This remake wasn’t all that great – it was basically Billy Bob Thornton picking up his Bad Santa role and plopping it into the timeless kids movie classic.  But for what it is, it’s not bad.  It earns a spot on my list, if only because I watched it.

 

What’s your favourite baseball movie?  Or sports movie in general?