Android Nougat First Impressions

I’ve had Nougat for a week by the time this post will publish, but I’ve got some first impressions based on my first few days of use. For reference, I use a Samsung Galaxy S7 edge, and it was upgraded from Marshmallow to 7.0.  Other relevant info – I’m using Evie Launcher*.

And yes, I realize that I’m a year late and Android O is already in the works, to release sometime this year.  Blame Samsung.

First Reaction

I really, really like the way this looks.  Everything looks sleek and well-designed.  If this makes any sense to you, it looks less “cartoon-y”, something which Samsung has been gradually moving away from since I started with the Galaxy S3.  Starting with Lollipop, they’ve been moving toward a more “stock” look with their notification / quick launch drawer.  I like it.

Digging Deeper

Past the visual elements, my phone somehow feels snappier.  I don’t really think it actually is any faster, but it feels like it is, which is important.  I feel like there’s something operating behind the scenes (maybe faster animation speeds?) that is making the difference.  I’m not speaking from a technological angle here – I don’t think they’ve done anything on the software side to affect RAM for example – but the software seems…optimized.  That’s the best term I can think of for it.

Battery life seems to be improved.  It’s hard for me to tell for sure, because I’m not using my phone the way I normally do right now.  Sometimes I’m actually using it less than I normally do.  The first day, I used it a LOT because I was playing around with it, and the battery life suffered accordingly.  Last Thursday though, I noticed that my battery life was only at 64% or so near the end of my work day, so that’s impressive.  I think some of the battery saving measures behind the scenes have been improved for Nougat.

Some other cool things have opened up for me, now that I have Nougat.  Previously, only Samsung’s Messages app allowed you to type out replies from the notification window.  Nougat adds this ability, so now I can do that with an app like Allo.  It’s pretty handy if you don’t want to leave whatever screen you’re on.  The other neat thing that Samsung added was some more utility to their Always On Display function on the S7 edge.

If they stopped at just adding more icon notifications I would have been happy; but you can also double-tap the app icon and it will unlock the screen and open the app with the notification.  That’s really cool and very useful!  To give you a quick comparison, on Marshmallow, only Samsung’s messages app and phone icons would show on Always On Display, and you couldn’t open the apps from there.

Overall Impression

This is definitely a very cool step forward for Android.  I don’t think that this update is revolutionary, but it’s the kind of update that would breathe new life into a phone (for example, if I added this to my S6 edge if it still worked – that would be amazing).  I don’t know how many phones will actually be getting it, as manufacturers tend to drop older phones from support even though they are capable of taking new operating system upgrades.

If you were on the fence of upgrading (or have the option of flashing a custom ROM with Nougat on it), you should definitely do it.  There aren’t any noticeable bugs that I can see and it runs really well.  It can only get better.  Can’t wait until I get Android O in 2018!

* I’ve actually switched back to Nova Launcher, because they added “Dynamic” notification badges, which are really cool and you should look into.

Coming up on Thursday: more Android talk focusing on Waze.

#myAndroid

Over the weekend I caught wind of a neat little toy released on Android.com called “My Android” (colloquially, #myAndroid).  The basic idea behind it is to show you how many different ways you can customize your Android set-up beyond the stock screen that you get when you first turn on your Android phone.

How does it work?

Once you head over to the #myAndroid website, and click on the ‘Find Your Match’ button, you’re guided through a series of (mostly) binary tests.  They want you to react, not to think, as you make your selections.

Some of the options are obvious, but there’s a test near the end that asks “Hot dogs or legs?” that is pretty funny, but I’m not sure what results are derived from it.

What does your match give you?

After you complete the little quiz, you’re shown three home screen options that are tailored to your tastes based on your selections.  A quick animation gives you an overview of what your home screen might look like.

Scroll down a bit further and it gives you some more details about each home screen: the launcher (this is the “skin” or “theme” layered on top of Android – more info here), icon pack, wallpaper, and keyboard (more on that in a second).  Along with each item there’s a direct Play Store link so you can download them.

Problems with the process

I mentioned that I’d get to the keyboard suggestion; that’s where there’s at least one problem with the whole process.  Every time you complete the test to find your match, every keyboard recommended is Gboard.  I’m not saying that Gboard is a bad keyboard (it’s the one I use, in fact), but it seems a bit disingenuous that no matter what, the #myAndroid website will suggest it every time without fail.  There are a lot of different keyboards out there, and different styles will suit some more than others; this test should just leave the keyboard match out completely.

The wallpaper suggestion leaves a little to be desired too.  It will give you one of two options: Backdrops or Zedge.  It will show you the suggestion based on your test selections, but won’t give you the name of it or what to search for in order to find it in the selected app.

Lastly, I’d also love to be able to sample some of the launchers in a virtual environment before trying them.  They give you a very brief animation but to me that’s not enough.

Overall impressions

This is a great tool, for both new and experienced Android users alike.  I’ve even seen mention on the Android subreddit from iPhone users that this has helped convince them to switch.

I’ve found two new launchers – Evie and Smart Launcher 3.  I’ve used Nova Launcher for almost the entire time I’ve used Android, but thought I’d try something new based on the suggestions given here.

I use Evie on my Galaxy S7 edge, and Smart Launcher on my Galaxy Tab S2.  Both have their advantages/disadvantages, and so far I feel that Smart Launcher works better on my tablet and I wouldn’t really like it on my phone.  Similarly with Evie, I find that it works great on my phone but isn’t something I’d use on my tablet.

Even if you just want to shake things up a little, I recommend taking the #myAndroid test to find your match.

On a side note – I finally have a set publishing schedule!  Enjoy new posts from me every Tuesday and Thursday from here on out.