Categories
Books Podcasts

Review: Heads by David Osborn

This Fall I read the 1985 medical thriller Heads by David Osborn. You can hear the audio version of it via The Slow Reader; full text is below!

About the book 

Publish date: December 1, 1985 

Back of the book summary: 

More shocking than Coma, more terrifying than The Terminal ManHeads is a thriller that goes deeper into the horrifying future of medicine than any novel has dared to go before. In an ultimate step into terror, David Osborn explores the murky boundaries between volunteer and victim, ambition and ruthlessness, life and death, when what begins as highly-classified research by a team of responsible doctors ends as a deadly game in which any of the players can be condemned to a purgatory more ghastly than hell. 

Quick notes about the summary – The Terminal Man was a 1972 Michael Chrichton book (who himself referred to it as his “least favourite work”). Coma probably refers to the 1977 novel by Robin Cook.  Osborn is also the author of a book called Open Season – best summarized by this review from Leslie on Goodreads

3 former college buddies meet every year for an annual hunting trip at their secluded lodge. For the past seven years they have kidnapped a young couple, forced them to commit humiliating acts and then after a short head start they begin hunting them down. 

From what you’ll hear about later in the review, that sounds on par with Heads

I also found Heads listed as The Head Hunters on Kindle (published 2017) when searching for it online, so if you’re unable to find it try using that title. It has quite a different book cover that looks like it was put together as a cut-and-paste job compared to the 1985 cover. Had I realized these books were identical I might have paid for the eBook rather than buy a physical copy. 

Speaking of which, that’s how I found the book! I first found it at a yard sale on Manitoulin Island over the summer; however, I decided not to buy it at the time. I realized after the fact that I should have bought it, so I bought a used copy from Amazon. It came from somewhere in California, but it looks like it originated from Alberta, Canada. I’d be interested in following that trail.  

Getting back to the book, some basic stats: 

  • There are 294 pages in the main story 
  • There are 36 chapters (with a prologue) 
  • There’s a preview of the book Evidence of Love by John Bloom and Jim Atkinson, apparently a true crime novel, at the end of the novel, plus an order form for more Bantam books 

My Reading Timeline 

I started reading Heads September 10th, and finished reading it October 23rd. Depending on how you calculate it, that’s 44 days, good for approximately 6.7 pages per day. Or by chapter count, 1.2 chapters per day.   

Questions to Answer 

Of all the things I want to cover in this review, I want to make sure I answer these questions I have about the novel, partly based on the back of the book: 

  1. Are the “murky boundaries between volunteer and victim, ambition and ruthlessness, life and death” really explored in this novel? 
  2. Did I feel that any character was in any real danger at any point in the story? 
  3. Further to question 2, did the story and setting seem at least believable (in other words, could I suspend my level of disbelief)? 
  4. Somewhat related, is this “future of medicine” really something that was considered to be plausible in 1985? 

I’ll circle back to these questions at the end of the review to provide a sort of summary of my thoughts both while I was reading, and after I finished the book. Up until this point the podcast has been spoiler-free for Heads, but while I’m not going to cover off the entire book as I’ve done previously, consider anything past this point to have potential spoilers (if you were intending on reading the book). 

What’s the book really about? 

The back-of-the-book synopsis is probably one of the vaguest descriptions of a book that I’ve ever read, yet it (combined with the cool cover) still managed to spark my interest. Still, it’s not very descriptive as to what actually happens in the book so here’s a short summary. 

The Borg-Harrison Institute is conducting highly-classified research experiments for the government or the military (to be honest, I’m not entirely clear who is funding this research).  Borg-Harrison scientists are recruiting volunteer patients who are about to die – those with terminal diseases, life-threatening physical problems and the like – and offer them extended life as life-supported heads.  No body, just their head attached to a console.  In exchange, they sever all contact with their previous life and remain hidden away in a research laboratory.   

One researcher, Susan McCollough, joins Borg-Harrison and starts working on the project – although she is unaware that the project is dealing with live severed heads.  Eventually she stumbles upon the secret and must tread carefully, or else she could end up with a severed head herself.  

So that’s what’s going on at the surface level. I’ll get into some more of the plot details as I talk about the book, but I want to introduce the main characters at least. Here’s who we’re dealing with:  

  • John Flemming. Brilliant scientist and “youngest-ever medical director of the University Hospital Brain Research Laboratory in Washington” 
  • Susan McCollough.  Another scientist, and John’s assistant –  which is why she’s brought on to work with Borg-Harrison. 
  • Michael Burgess. The lead scientist and surgeon on the project. 
  • Katherine Blair. A psychologist working on the project, is closely involved with Michael. 
  • Al Luczynski. An anesthesiologist at Borg-Harrison. Apparently has a talent to perfectly imitate other people’s voices which pays off only in one scene to manufacture a tense moment. 
  • Toni Soong. Michael’s assistant in surgery. 

There are some smaller characters in the novel as well, but those are the main players. All of the lead doctors and scientists all seem to be considered experts in their field. They also know how to party, and that’s how we’re first introduced to them. Oh, and they’re also all extremely good looking. Somehow, Osborn still manages to give them a different look while still making them out to have perfect bodies. I guess in a way, it worked for me – I was able to get different mental pictures of the characters.   

That’s another thing, though; Osborn seemed to have a penchant for describing Katherine’s “titian” hair. I’d never heard of that before; apparently it’s a “brownish shade of red hair” often confused with auburn hair. I thought it was overused in the book at first, but the descriptor came up at another point in the novel to create a somewhat helpful context so I would again conclude that in terms of physical descriptions, Osborn was able to differentiate the characters very well. 

However, that’s where the “characters done well” bit stops. I felt that the personalities and motivations of the characters were all surface-level, with very little depth to any of them. The characters also portray some viewpoints very much rooted in the 1980’s. The men in the novel are seen to be powerful, and the women are forced to use “their gender” to advance their careers or ambitions. Katherine in particular is portrayed as cold and calculating, and the few times we get limited 3rd person narration from her perspective don’t do very much to cast a better light. She’s basically there to be a manipulative, power-hungry antagonist for Susan, the lead character of the novel.  

About Susan – it’s more than a little disappointing that a lot of her actions are governed by her overwhelming attraction to men in the novel. The book starts with her and John Flemming together, but when he dies early in the novel it devastates her. This is understandable, I mean I can’t imagine going through losing a loved one. But not too long after John’s death, she becomes overwhelmingly attracted to Michael and many of her decisions in the novel (until probably the last third of the book) are only in conflict because she is so attracted to Michael. Part of the attraction is rooted in his physical appearance, but they have very frequent, mind-blowing sex in the middle of the novel (some of which is described in somewhat amusing detail, but mostly just referred to in passing). The way it’s written, Susan seems to be very much controlled by her relationship with Michael and finds it hard to think straight.  

I guess you could say that I wasn’t impressed with the characters and how they were written. Luckily, the story moved along at a good pace and was interesting enough that I could look past the poor characterization. And I actually enjoyed at the way information was slowly revealed as I read along. It wasn’t a mystery novel so I didn’t feel cheated that plot details were withheld behind-the-scenes, so to speak. 

After John Flemming dies in a horrible car accident, we mostly follow Susan’s point of view with a few glimpses into the other characters actions. Most of the information that we need comes from Susan’s limited viewpoints; we really only check in with the other characters so that we know what’s going on at the surface. Osborn seems deliberately vague with what they’re talking about (even though we can kind of infer what’s really happening), but that’s okay.  

As Susan moves out of her deep depression due to John’s passing and starts to work for Borg-Harrison, we start to get more details revealed – both from Susan’s perspective, and from the other characters – and it mainly follows at the same pace as Susan’s revelations.  

For example, once Susan joins Borg-Harrison, we start to get some more details about squabbling between the scientists and the source of their funding. Not too long after that, while frustratingly coming to an impasse in her work, Susan accidentally discovers John is technically still alive in the form of a disembodied head connected to a console. He’s not the only one – there are five or six active “volunteers” in a restricted floor of the institute. Once Susan finds out what the project she’s working on is truly about, that’s when the information just starts flowing out.  

We get some more insight into just how close this project is to failure, and the inner machinations of the research institute as they try to figure out how to minimize any damage potentially caused by Susan’s discovery of the heads. The solution is to give her full access, and as Susan learns more and works more closely with John, more and more is revealed. We even get point of view chapters from the heads themselves, which in itself is interesting. At one point, they also go through the surgery involved in severing a head from the body and keeping it alive (although in that surgery, there’s an error and the head dies anyway).  

Eventually we learn more about the nature of the volunteers. They’re supposed to be those that are basically dead already – either a terminal disease that has almost run its course, or some other reason that their bodies will cause them to die. But it’s revealed that Katherine is fudging things – an unknown number of volunteers could be people who are healthy and not close to death at all. It’s implied that John Flemming’s signature was forged while he was being worked on in the hospital after his accident. 

This revelation about the source of the heads is actually very important, because it lays the foundation of the threat to Susan’s life – that she could very easily become a head on a console. In fact, that’s the main conflict at the end of the novel.  John dies, and in order to deal with knowing too much, Katherine and Michael conspire to put Susan’s head on a console. I actually wasn’t sure what direction the book would take, and thought that it was possible Osborn could actually do this to the protagonist.  

Spoilers! She makes it as far as the prep table for surgery. Part of the prep process includes shaving the head of the “volunteer” and drawing incision lines across the neck. This is what leads to a fairly cringe-inducing scene. Susan escapes, and eventually encounters Katherine in a locker room. She knocks her out cold, and anesthesiologist Al L. walks in to find her unconscious, on the floor. His first thought is not to help her out – far from it. 

No, his first thought is that he’ll never get another chance to have Katherine in such a vulnerable position again. His second thought is that he could do whatever he wanted to and take advantage of her. The only reason he doesn’t take off his own pants is that he realizes he has no time and would get caught. So he hides her hair and draws the incision lines across her neck. He figures that no one would be able to tell the difference between her and Susan without hair and naked from the neck down. 

I guess he was right, because it’s Katherine that ends up on the surgery table when the details of the program are revealed to the media – but too late to stop the surgery in progress. 

That’s probably the only spot in the novel that I thought could have been ripped right out.  

Highlights from the Book 

I dog-eared some pages while I was reading because there were some passages there that I wanted to highlight.  Here they are: 

“Al Luczynski, wearing an undersized bikini completely at odds with his round bearded face and big bearish body…” Was bikini an often-used term for Speedo’s in the 80’s? Weird image from this quote. 

In chapter 10, Katherine is going to the Borg-Harrison headquarters to meet the board chairman, and Osborn describes the house in great length. His wording for when she doesn’t find him is odd: “Katherine found him not there.” Wouldn’t it have been better to say “Katherine didn’t find him there”? 

Chapter 20 – not a particular line, but this chapter was unique in that it was from the viewpoint of John. It was neat to get inside his head (no pun intended) and then he also describes the surgery process. Chapter 23 was also from the heads’ viewpoint and what goes on “after hours”. 

Answering the Questions 

Getting back to the questions I asked earlier, let’s start with number one. 

Are the “murky boundaries between volunteer and victim, ambition and ruthlessness, life and death” really explored in this novel? 

I would say no. That quote implies to me that there are current processes in medical sciences (current in 1985, at least) that would be explored. It’s true that the line between volunteer and victim blur in the novel, but I don’t think they were really “explored” in the meaning I’m thinking about. As far as I can tell from the book, it’s clear that the research project started with good intentions and was all “proper”, at least as proper as severing heads and keeping them alive could be.  

But eventually as they started experiencing problems keeping heads alive or useful, and running out of viable candidates to volunteer, the board director basically tells Katherine “don’t tell me what you’re doing and I won’t ask” when it comes to being creative with procuring new subjects. Once we have that topic broached by the characters, it seems like the novel tailspins into creative new ways Katherine can find new volunteers.  

So no, this “murky boundary” is pretty much just a surface-level feature of the book. 

Did I feel that any character was in any real danger at any point in the story? 

Yes! I mentioned earlier that I thought Susan could potentially end up a severed head on a console at the end of the book. And I guess by direct correlation, Katherine was for sure in danger at the end. The book was at least realistic in terms of not protecting characters or pulling punches. 

Further to question 2, did the story and setting seem at least believable (in other words, could I suspend my level of disbelief)? 

I don’t truly know much about research projects or hospitals, but I had a hard time believing in the characters. They all seemed to be partying and sleeping with each other, and were all perfect specimens of the human race (except for an avuncular old man working at the institute, who made me think of Ducky from NCIS).   

But yes, I suspended my disbelief a little bit while reading the book. I don’t mean that as I was reading I believed that what they were doing was truly possible. I just mean that there wasn’t really anything in the book (the almost-rape scene aside) that made me stop reading and say, “well there’s no way that could happen.”  In the universe of the novel, it was believable. 

Somewhat related, is this “future of medicine” really something that was considered to be plausible in 1985? 

This one I need to research a little bit. Unfortunately it’s not something that comes too easily in a Google search. I think I’d have to dive deep and read some essays, but I’m not really interested in doing that (nor do I have the time). I picked a bad question to ask, in retrospect. I did find some breakthroughs in medical treatments in the early 80’s, though, and they included things like vaccines, MRI scanners, and apparently a surgical robot.  

Digging a little deeper, apparently artificial skin was discovered and developed in the late 70’s and early 80’s. But also in 1981 was the first successful combined heart-lung transplant. Since the novel features what I would call a head transplant (from a body to a machine), I looked up some more transplant firsts near the 1980’s. Here’s a short list: 

  • 1963 – First human liver transplant; first human lung transplant 
  • 1966 – First human pancreas transplant 
  • 1967 – First human heart transplant 

So I suppose if you were to look at what was happening in medical technology I’d argue that you could speculate the kind of procedure described in Heads would be at least plausible. I’m rather impressed by the research David Osborn seems to have done in this field.  

Wrapping Up 

Overall I scored this book 2 stars on Goodreads. My one-paragraph review: 

The characters act on a mostly surface level in this book, but the plot was interesting enough to keep me going. A lot of 80s view points very obvious in the characters too. 

Obviously, I’ve done a bit more thinking about the novel since then and went a little further in-depth. But I still stand by the 2-star review. It’s a very disposable novel, and I’ll probably forget about it in years to come and never re-read it. The characters are not at all memorable and some of the secondary characters are very cartoon-like and have exaggerated traits. If you want to read this book, find a very cheap copy (free, if you can) but don’t spend a lot of time hunting this down.  

Categories
Books Podcasts

Slow Reader Episode 5 – Gone – Chapters 13-19

I changed things up a little bit. I discovered that taking detailed notes every time I read a chapter is not my optimal reading method, so I went back to how I normally read books and took notes AFTER. I like the result this week.


I doubled my reading output and read 6 chapters over 2 weeks. Covering off chapters 13 through 19 in this episode, things have escalated very quickly in Perdido Beach.

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/stephen_g

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/2474979-stephen-gower

Categories
writing

A Short Story Suggestion

I haven’t written anything in a while (specifically referring to this blog) and while there is a post I want to work on, I’m feeling a little unmotivated to put a lot of effort into crafting it (or even another post on another subject). So instead, here is a link to a short story I read over the holidays that I enjoyed.

It’s by Wil Wheaton. He wrote it on a bad mental health day, and I thought it was pretty good!

http://wilwheaton.net/2018/12/the-captain-dreams-of-flying-but-hes-oh-so-scared-of-heights/

I tried to embed the post into this one but I’m betting that there’s a security setting on Wil’s end that prevents this, so instead just click on the link and read it that way 🙂

Categories
Podcasts

Interesting Podcasts

I can’t remember the last time I did one of these, so that must mean it’s time to write one!  

Originally I was going to dedicate an entire post to Make Dad Read Comics; I would still like to do that, but I’m still feeling a little conflicted because I don’t want to draw too much attention to the fact that the titular Dad (Patrick Sr.) passed away in July.  I cannot share this podcast enough, and while it is sad that it won’t be continuing, the massive backlog of shows is well worth listening to for two reasons:

  1. The conversations Patrick and his Dad had are often hilarious and heartwarming.  It’s also great to hear the progression Dad makes from the beginning of the show to the end.  His understanding of comics was on display and it’s a real treat to listen to the shows where he really likes a book they read.
  2. You can learn about some new comics / books to read that may not have been on your radar.  I’m currently reading Black Monday Murders, which was the second to last episode they did together.  It’s fantastic.  Previous to that I read I Kill Giants.  Both of these books were highly rated by Patrick & Dad.  I just saw today that I also have Persepolis waiting for me at the library.

Twenty Thousand Hertz – I’ve talked about this podcast in the past, so I thought I would highlight a particular episode that I really enjoyed:  Episode 46 | Slot Machines.  The sound design in this episode was amazing.  The producers did a great job of replicating the casino sounds (there was even a moment where they layered in the various sounds of the casino one at a time, and ended up with what it actually sounds like at a casino).  It was fun to learn about some of the techniques they employ as well, and the history of slot machine music.  Very fun, I highly recommend it.  And it won’t leave you jaded about the slot machine industry.

The Big Story – this one is produced by Rogers Media (I work there, I have to mention that), and is a Mon-Fri (except holidays) daily show that covers the “big topics” (hence…the Big Story) of the day.  The episodes are about 20 minutes in length, and up until this week I’ve been listening to all of them.  They’ve been pretty interesting so far, but some topics I decided I can skip – I don’t need to be a completest here.

Based On A True Story – I haven’t listened to any of the most recent episodes, but checked out A League Of Their Own and The Social Network.  The gist of this one is the host watches movies that are, well, based on a true story, and researches the true story behind them.  I’ve picked out a few movies I’ve seen and want to hear his take behind, and as I go through the list I realize that there are more I missed the first time and need to add.  The episodes are short and easily digestible (usually around the 30 minute mark) so they make for a fun break between my usual episode list.

What else have you got that I haven’t listed here?  Maybe I can check it out in 2-3 months when I’ve caught up on my 90+ shows 🙂 

Categories
Movies

The Last Jedi (Spoilers!)

The Last Jedi has been out in theatres for at least a month now, which I feel makes it safe to talk about the movie without holding back on spoilers.  With that said, it’s been a while since I’ve seen it, so the details will be somewhat vague.  I won’t be revealing specific plot points (I don’t think, anyway), but I might talk about specific moments in the film.  If you’re okay with that, read on; otherwise wait until you’ve seen the film.  These are some of my thoughts on the controversies and overall opinion of the movie.

Spoiler Alert
Spoiler Alert

Categories
Comics

Comic Book Review Series

Comic books, man.

One of the things I’ve always wanted to do is create an online comic, or write a comic book.  The only problem is that I can’t draw worth a hill of beans.  And I’m not a super avid reader of comics, but there are a select few that I’ve found that I enjoy.

These aren't the comic books I'm talking about, but they look cool!
These aren’t the comic books I’m talking about, but they look cool!

So I thought I would spend the month of August reading and reviewing comic books – both physical and online.  I have a bit of a backlog building on my shelf that I want to power through.  Posts are going to come out at least weekly, but I will likely have some bonus posts to throw up because I think I have more comics to talk about than there are weeks in the month.

This one is also pretty cool.  Now I wish I could add it to my list.
This one is also pretty cool. Now I wish I could add it to my list.

Here’s a preview of some of the comics I’m going to review, in no particular order:
– Atomic Robo Volume 1
– Universe Vol 01 (from http://panelsyndicate.com/)
– The Private Eye Vol 01 (from http://panelsyndicate.com/)
– Barrier (from http://panelsyndicate.com/)
– Batman “A Word to the Wise” (Strange Zellers tie-in from 1992)
– Strange Tales of Oscar Zahn
– Poe Dameron: Black Squadron (Vol 1, issues 1-6)
– Suicide Squad “Blood & Snow” Part Two (near as I can tell, issue 12 from April 1988)

That list in itself grew as I was typing up this entry as I find more things to read.  This is not ideal but also great at the same time.  Anyway, I have a lot of reading to do (and this is on top of trying to finish a bunch of novels) so I’d better get cracking!

Categories
writing

Story Idea Up For Grabs

I got a story idea a few weeks ago, but I haven’t really bothered to put pen to paper to develop it at all.  So it’s now up for grabs!

Take them.
Take them.

I was listening to Almost Educational Episode 131 about time travel.  At some point while I was listening, the idea for a piece of flash fiction popped into my head.  Unfortunately, as is usually the case with my ideas, if I don’t act on it fast, the motivation to do it fades pretty quickly.

The main premise is this: The phenomenon known as “frequency illusion” (also known as the “Baader-Meinhof phenomenon”) is actually a ripple effect caused by some kind of change to the timeline in the past.

That’s about as far as I got with the idea, so I’d love to see what someone can come up with here.  If it’s already been done, point me in the right direction!

Categories
Books

The Mechanical – A Review

I recently (more like finally) finished The Mechanical, an alternate history novel written by Ian Tregillis.

The Mechanical Review
The Mechanical – cover from Goodreads

Setting

The Mechanical is the first of three books in a series known as The Alchemy Wars.  In this novel’s universe, the Dutch are the world’s super-power, having mastered alchemy and keeping order with various models of mechanical men, known as “clakkers”.  France is the only nation to really oppose the Dutch, and do so with chemicals.

Most of the story takes place in New Amsterdam (North America), with smaller parts taking place in Europe.

Characters

We are introduced early on to three characters: Jax, a clakker (mechanical servitor); Berenice, a French spymaster; and Visser, a Catholic priest working for Berenice undercover in Dutch territory.  As the book winds along, it’s clear that the main characters in the story are Berenice and Jax, with Visser serving a secondary yet important purpose.

As characters go, both Berenice and Jax have a well-defined character arc, each of them complete within the novel with a beginning, middle, and end.  Visser’s story doesn’t really reach a conclusion in this novel, which leads me to believe that he’ll have a more significant role in the next novel in the series (The Rising, also published in 2015).

I found that I didn’t really like Visser, though.  He was somewhat cowardly and really thought highly of himself and his role.  I imagine I felt about him the way I was supposed to – he was definitely very self-aggrandizing, to the point where he wasn’t very good at his job as a spy.

Beyond those three characters though, there wasn’t a lot of depth.   I give The Mechanical a grade of B- for characters.

Story & Writing

I mentioned at the top that I “finally” finished reading The Mechanical last week…this is because I started reading it over a year ago.  The story builds up very slowly at the beginning.  This is a 400+ page book, but I think it could benefit from some culling.

Part of the problem is that Tregillis has to do a lot of world building to start the novel, because you need to be able to see how everything works AND understand how the Dutch took and remain in power.  But the downside to this is that it progresses very slowly in the first half.

Once we get into the second half, and especially in the last third, the pace really picks up.  I think this part of the book is a better demonstration of Tregillis’ skill as a writer, because his pages aren’t being spent giving us long scenes of exposition.

Overall I like the aesthetics presented in the book.  It’s always neat to get a peak at alternative histories, and this one is very well thought out.  I do appreciate that things weren’t spelled out, but I could still understand the background.  The writing was a bit to “gratuitous” at times but generally, it’s good.  I give The Mechanical a B- for Story and Writing.

Wrap-Up 

While I really enjoyed the last third of the book, the first two thirds really didn’t do it for me.  Normally, a “long” book for me takes a few months to slog through.  This one took a year, and I stopped to read other things in between.  I can’t in good conscience give The Mechanical a strong rating.

On GoodReads, I gave it 3/5 stars.  Keeping with the letter grades I’ve been giving in this blog post, The Mechanical deserves a C+; a good read for parts of it, with strong main characters, but it really drags and feels like a chore to read in many other parts.

Coming up this week on the blog: a look at Paul Feig’s online TV show, Other Space.

Categories
writing

Looking Back at Old Reviews

For some reason while writing yesterday’s post, I went looking at older posts from my old blog.  One thing that struck me immediately was that I wrote very prolifically, and with just about the same enthusiasm as I am with this blog.  A lot of the early posts are reviews of different pieces of media I’ve consumed recently, and my overall thoughts about them.

With one of my goals for 2017 being to read more, I thought I would have a look at some of the things I’ve read over the years.  I’ve identified a few things that I want to have another look at, based on my original reactions and the fact that I don’t remember what they’re about anymore.

Hunter by Wil Wheaton.  This appears to be an eBook that Wil Wheaton originally released as a pay-what-you-can title.  You can pick it up from Amazon for 75 cents, and apparently I really liked it the last time I read it, so that sounds like a steal.  According to this post, I originally paid $1.00.  Well worth it.

I, Robot by Cory Doctorow.  From the same post I reviewed Hunter, I reviewed I, Robot as well.  These two stories sound like they would make a good sci-fi double-header and darn it all, I wish I knew what twist I was talking about!

I wasn’t getting why it was titled “I, Robot” until the payoff at the very end.

World of Wonders by Robertson Davies.  I don’t think I ever finished this novel, the third and final piece of the Deptford Trilogy.  In fact I might want to re-read Fifth Business and The Manticore before I come back to World of Wonders.  This might be on the back-burner, as I have several other novels I want to read through this year.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline.  I read his latest novel Armada last year, and liked it a lot.  It’s been in the back of my head to re-read Ready Player One for a while, so maybe I’ll do that at some point.

I think that’s all I need to revisit for now.  I thought there might have been more, but I don’t have time to read through all my old posts at the moment.